Posts Tagged ‘movies’

shorts: 14

Posted: August 31, 2016 in Arts
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You want movie reviews? We got movie reviews! Not enough? Click here!

Game, The (1997) – Extremely engrossing, well-acted puzzle continually stretches, before finally snapping, any reasonable measure of plausibility. (2½) – 08/31/16

Florence Foster Jenkins (2016) – Not one false note in this compelling and melancholy story of a (more…)

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Many people share their opinions without being asked. We here at Trask Avenue honor that tradition with our periodic one sentence movie reviews. For additional highly subjective assessments, click here.

Martian, The (2015) – The story of an astronaut stranded so far away often hits so very close to home. (3½) – 7/18/16

Walk on the Moon, A (1999) – Strong performances bolster this ordinary (more…)

Searching for something to watch, but don’t have the time to read movie reviews that drone on longer than one sentence? Look no further! We’re here to help with the latest installment of Shorts! And, if you want more opinions, the entire list can be found here.

Salt (2010) – Standard spy thriller is far more entertaining than could be reasonably expected. (3) – 3/10/15

They Were So Young (1954) – High class modeling opportunities in Rio merely (more…)

shorts: 10

Posted: August 2, 2013 in Arts
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One sentence movie reviews returns for a tenth spin. All the reels can be found here!

Stories We Tell (2012) – Engrossing multi-layered documentary illustrates there is often more than people realize in any family story. (4) – 8/2/13

Auntie Mame (1958) – Larger-than-life socialite is suddenly saddled with (more…)

Deeds in court

I re-watched Mr. Deeds Goes to Town a few days ago, Frank Capra’s 1936 fanciful tale of Longfellow Deeds, an everyman from rural Vermont who inherits a vast fortune. It contains many hallmark Capra elements: a good person forced to confront a whirlwind of greed and/or corruption, a sentimental and idealized view of small town life, a smart, savvy female lead, and snappy, intelligent dialogue. It is by all accounts very Capraesque.

The first time viewer may think the movie horribly dated, one that shows every wrinkle and crease of its 77 years. We no longer tolerate plot advancement through (more…)

Mistletoe and eggnog lead to strange things, like writing short reviews about a selection of Christmas movies both recent and old. As always “Shorts” reviews are limited to one sentence with a maximum of 20 words. If you wish to see the entire list (trust me, it’s a quick read) click here. Ho! Ho! Ho!

Miracle on 34th Street (1947) – The word “precocious” was probably coined after 8 year old Natalie Wood lit up the screen in this enduring favorite. (3) – 12/21/12

Love Actually (2003) – Christmas for the (more…)

A cool autumn evening is a perfect time to revisit movies, both good and otherwise. The complete list of reviewed films can be found on the Shorts page.

Safety Not Guaranteed (2012) – Quirky tale of accidental journalist pursuing a story of (more…)

My current attention span leads to this latest installment of Shorts.

Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (2010) – Graphic novel sensation translates to quirky, extremely likeable film with Cera battling Winstead’s seven evil exes. (3½) – 7/8/12

Thrill of It All, The (1963) – Harmless sudsy comedy follows Day’s journey from (more…)

It’s been a while since we dipped into the film archive, so the time has come to rectify that. For the complete list of reviews pop over to the Shorts page. Places everyone! And…Action!

One for the Money (2012) – After years of anticipation Janet Evanovich’s bounty hunter comes to the big screen and is not a plum worth picking. (2) – 5/23/12

Happy Feet (2006) – Box office animated smash left me (more…)

The Conduct of the Game – John Hough Jr.

If baseball movies had a batting average it would be about .250. Not enough juice to be an all-star, but good enough to stay in the game. To help baseball filmdom I scout around for stories which could hit a Hollywood home run. This is because I am the studio puppet master, the guy who green lights films the way NFL players herd baby mamas. One phone call, one meeting, one lunch with me and your movie is golden. (And once that first phone call/meeting/lunch happens I’ll prove it.) This novel would be a fine start. It does not possess the nail-biting tension of more conventional sports films. No last minute drama, no death or glory moments. Instead, we visit a more subdued world – minor league umpiring in the 1950’s where the people are the stars. The characters are so well drawn you know them once you meet them resulting in a story brimming with quiet dignity. (more…)